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WagnerWolf.com: MEDICAL MONDAYS – Internal Organs

Hi! The human body is so amazing, so let’s discover some facts about it today…

  1. The largest internal organ is the small intestine. Despite being called the smaller of the two intestines, your small intestine is actually four times as long as the average adult is tall. If it weren’t looped back and forth upon itself it wouldn’t fit inside the abdominal cavity.
  2. The human heart creates enough pressure to squirt blood 30 feet. No wonder you can feel your heartbeat so easily. Pumping blood through your body quickly and efficiently takes quite a bit of pressure resulting in the strong contractions of the heart and the thick walls of the ventricles which push blood to the body.
  3. The acid in your stomach is strong enough to dissolve razorblades. While you certainly shouldn’t test the fortitude of your stomach by eating a razorblade or any other metal object for that matter, the acids that digest the food you eat aren’t to be taken lightly. Hydrochloric acid, the type found in your stomach, is not only good at dissolving the pizza you had for dinner but can also eat through many types of metal.
  4. The human body is estimated to have 60,000 miles of blood vessels. To put that in perspective, the distance around the earth is about 25,000 miles, making the distance your blood vessels could travel if laid end to end more than two times around the earth.
  5. You get a new stomach lining every three to four days. The mucus-like cells lining the walls of the stomach would soon dissolve due to the strong digestive acids in your stomach if they weren’t constantly replaced. Those with ulcers know how painful it can be when stomach acid takes its toll on the lining of your stomach.
  6. The surface area of a human lung is equal to a tennis court. In order to more efficiently oxygenate the blood, the lungs are filled with thousands of branching bronchi and tiny, grape-like alveoli. These are filled with microscopic capillaries which oxygen and carbon dioxide. The large amount of surface area makes it easier for this exchange to take place, and makes sure you stay properly oxygenated at all times.
  7. Women’s hearts beat faster than men’s.The main reason for this is simply that on average women tend to be smaller than men and have less mass to pump blood to. But women’s and men’s hearts can actually act quite differently, especially when experiencing trauma like a heart attack, and many treatments that work for men must be adjusted or changed entirely to work for women.
  8. Scientists have counted over 500 different liver functions. You may not think much about your liver except after a long night of drinking, but the liver is one of the body’s hardest working, largest and busiest organs. Some of the functions your liver performs are: production of bile, decomposition of red blood cells, plasma protein synthesis, and detoxification.
  9. The aorta is nearly the diameter of a garden hose. The average adult heart is about the size of two fists, making the size of the aorta quite impressive. The artery needs to be so large as it is the main supplier of rich, oxygenated blood to the rest of the body.
  10. Your left lung is smaller than your right lung to make room for your heart. For most people, if they were asked to draw a picture of what the lungs look like they would draw both looking roughly the same size. While the lungs are fairly similar in size, the human heart, though located fairly centrally, is tilted slightly to the left making it take up more room on that side of the body and crowding out that poor left lung.
  11. You could remove a large part of your internal organs and survive. But who would ever do that?  The human body may appear fragile but it’s possible to survive even with the removal of the stomach, the spleen, 75 percent of the liver, 80 percent of the intestines, one kidney, one lung, and virtually every organ from the pelvic and groin area. You might not feel too great, but the missing organs wouldn’t kill you.
  12. The adrenal glands change size throughout life. The adrenal glands, lying right above the kidneys, are responsible for releasing stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. In the seventh month of a fetus’ development, the glands are roughly the same size as the kidneys. At birth, the glands have shrunk slightly and will continue to do so throughout life. In fact, by the time a person reaches old age, the glands are so small they can hardly be seen.

What’s your favorite organ? Body system?? Learn to love your body!! WagnerWolf.com

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WagnerWolf.com: MEDICAL MONDAYS – Hopkins Edition

Let’s learn some facts about my alma mater:

The Johns Hopkins University Fun Facts

“ The public is sensitive to little things, and they wouldn’t have full confidence in a college that didn’t know how to spell ‘John.’” -Mark Twain
Why the extra S? Johns Hopkins’ given name was the maiden name of his great-grandmother, Margaret Johns.

Johns Hopkins’ formal education ended when he was 12, after his devout Quaker parents freed their slaves and put Johns and his brothers to work in the fields in 1807. When he was a young merchant, Johns temporarily fell out of favor with the Quakers because he and his brothers sold whiskey, which was known as “Hopkins Best.”

The university’s Peabody Institute, which celebrated its 150th anniversary in 2007, was the first academy of music established in America.

Johns Hopkins University was the first research university established in the United States. Contrary to popular belief, there were undergraduate students from the time the university opened on October 3, 1876. The first doctorates were awarded in 1878 and the first bachelors in 1879.

The Johns Hopkins University Press, founded in 1878, is the oldest continuously-operating university press in the United States.

In 1879, an important commercial discovery emerged from the laboratory of Ira Remsen, the university’s first chemistry professor and second president. While working under Remsen’s direction, post-doctoral fellow, Constantine Fahlberg, discovered saccharin and later made a fortune with the commercial development of the new sweetener. Incidentally, Remsen’s ashes are interred behind a plaque in the campus chemistry building bearing his name.

 

What do YOU know about Johns Hopkins?? See all the contributors who went there in our book, So You Wanna Be A Doctor (wagnerwolf.com)

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